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United Nations Command honors fallen Korean War heroes

UNC Honor Guard moves a transfer case

Honor guard from NATO countries participate in a dignified transfer as part of a repatriation ceremony at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The United Nations Command in Korea remains committed to enforcing the 1953 UN Armistice Agreement and overseeing activities such as this repatriation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Noah Sudolcan)

A casket sits on a loader

A casket prepares to be loaded onto a Boeing 747 as part of a repatriation ceremony at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The remains are thought to be of a U.S. soldier killed in the 1950-53 Korean War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Noah Sudolcan)

A casket sits on a loader

A casket prepares to be loaded onto a Boeing 747 as part of a repatriation ceremony at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The remains are thought to be of a U.S. soldier killed in the 1950-53 Korean War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Noah Sudolcan)

A chaplain says a prayer during a repatriation ceremony

United Nations Command Chaplain Col. David Bowlus, performs a blessing of sacrifice and remembrance on the six boxes of remains thought to be of U.S. soldiers killed in the 1950-53 Korean War at Osan Air Base in South Korea, June 26, 2020. The UNC remains committed to enforcing the 1953 UN Armistice Agreement and overseeing this repatriation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Noah Sudolcan)

UNC Honor Guard moves a transfer case

Honor guard from NATO countries participate in a dignified transfer as part of a repatriation ceremony at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The United Nations Command in Korea remains committed to enforcing the 1953 UN Armistice Agreement and overseeing activities such as this repatriation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Noah Sudolcan)

UNC Honor Guard carry transfer case to aircraft

The United Nations Command Honor Guard carry a casket as part of a dignified transfer during a repatriation ceremony at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. After boarding a Boeing 747, the remains will travel to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, where members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency will attempt to identify the remains of the fallen heroes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Betty Chevalier)

UNC Honor Guard carries a transfer case to an aircraft

Members from the United Nations Command Honor Guard remove a dignified transfer case containing the remains fallen Korean War heroes from a vehicle and load it onto a waiting Boeing 747 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The UNC repatriated six cases of remains from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea on the 67th anniversary of the Korean Armistice Agreement, which ensured the cessation of hostilities of the Korean War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Betty R. Chevalier)

An American Flag is draped over a transfer case on aircraft

An American flag drapes a transfer case in the cargo hold of a Boeing 747 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The UNC, with support from United States Forces Korea, came together to repatriate six cases of remains returned by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. The repatriation falls on the 67th anniversary of the Korean Armistice Agreement, which ensured the cessation of hostilities of the Korean War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Betty R. Chevalier)

Airmen salute a transfer case during a repatriation

U.S. Air Force Airmen pay their respects during a repatriation ceremony at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The United Nations Command remains committed to enforcing the 1953 UN Armistice Agreement and overseeing this repatriation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Betty R. Chevalier)

A United Nations Command flag is draped over a transfer case on aircraft
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A United Nations Command flag drapes a transfer case in the cargo hold of a Boeing 747 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The UNC, with support from United States Forces Korea, came together to repatriate six cases of remains returned by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. The repatriation falls on the 67th anniversary of the Korean Armistice Agreement, which ensured the cessation of hostilities of the Korean War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Betty R. Chevalier)

Airmen salute a transfer case during a repatriation
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U.S. Air Force Airmen render a salute to a dignified transfer case containing six cases of remains at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 26, 2020. The remains flown to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, where members of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency will attempt to identify the remains of the fallen heroes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Betty R. Chevalier)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --

A rare, solemn silence lingers over a normally bustling flightline. The stillness of the runway temporarily fades as a vehicle slowly bypasses spectators rendering salutes and clutching their hands over their hearts, awaiting troops returning from combat.

Coming to a halt, the automobile unveils six service members, but instead of walking out to fanfare for a heroes’ welcome, these members were transported by pallbearers in a United Nations Command flag-draped casket and recognized for their ultimate sacrifice: giving their lives during the Korean War - in the wake of the conflict’s 70th Anniversary.

Formally called a repatriation ceremony, U.S. Army Col. David Bowlus, UNC chaplain, commemorated their valor before they were loaded onto a Boeing 747.

“Almighty God, we thank you for the distinct honor to return our fallen comrades to their final resting place,” said Bowlus. “Although separated from their countrymen, they were never forgotten. Although once lost, they are now found. In this solemn moment, we thank you for their noble sacrifice. God grant to these your servants eternal rest, and may their return bring peace to all who have prayed and waited in hope for this day.”

“May their valor and commitment become a seed that would nurture us and future generations to love even unto laying down our lives so others may be free,” Bowlus added. “Our fallen comrades honored their country in life, and we, on behalf of our grateful nations, honor them now.”

The UNC has remained committed to enforcing the 1953 Armistice Agreement, which includes the return of fallen service members. The conflict resulted in the deaths of more than 178,000 UNC service members leaving approximately 7,700 men behind enemy lines unable to return home, devastating families longing for closure.

Today, these six names are unknown, but after transport to a forensic lab at Hawaii’s Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is hopeful to identify these individuals to provide closure for family and friends.  

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