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Airmen, Soldiers, Sailors Tackle TCCC

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen participate in ‘Care Under Fire’ and Tactical Field Care as part of their Tactical Combat Casualty Care assessment.

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen participate in ‘Care Under Fire’ and Tactical Field Care as part of their Tactical Combat Casualty Care assessment at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. The program consists of three phases Care Under Fire, Tactical Field Care and Tactical Evacuation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Medics listen to a safety brief concerning loading and unloading wounded patients into a UH-60 helicopter.

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen kick off their last day of Tactical Combat Casualty Care training with a safety brief concerning loading and unloading wounded patients into a UH-60 helicopter at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. TCCC is the new standard of medical training proficiency for military personnel to better prepare medics for potential combat situations in an ongoing effort to heighten medical readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Medics listen to a safety brief concerning loading and unloading wounded patients into a UH-60 helicopter.

Medical personnel kick off their last day of Tactical Combat Casualty Care training with a safety brief concerning loading and unloading wounded patients into a UH-60 helicopter at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. Over the course of three days, personnel assigned to Yokota Air Base, Naval Air Facility Atsugi and Camp Zama Army Post, Japan, spent time in the classroom and in the field in order to complete TCCC training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Medics load a gurney into a UH-60 helicopter

Medics load a gurney into a UH-60 helicopter as part of Tactical Combat Casualty Care training at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. TCCC training will better prepare medics for potential combat situations in an ongoing effort to heighten medical readiness and is crucial both at home and deployed environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen participate in ‘care under fire’ and tactical field care as part of their Tactical Combat Casualty Care assessment.

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen participate in ‘care under fire’ and tactical field care as part of their Tactical Combat Casualty Care assessment at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. The implementation of TCCC enhances the readiness and battlefield capability and provides the tools and skills U.S. forces need to be equipped to continue to protect and defend the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Medics interact with a wounded training mannequin during the Tactical Field Care phase of the Tactical Combat Casualty Care.

Airman 1st Class Brittney Steadman, 374th Medical Group surgical technician and Staff Sergeant Montini Soriano, 374th MDG urgent care technician interact with a wounded training mannequin during the Tactical Field Care phase of the Tactical Combat Casualty Care course at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. Medics participating in the newly designed TCCC course were instructed to wear non-serviceable uniforms and fully emerge themselves in a simulated real-life combat injury response. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Air Force and Navy medical personnel interact with a wounded training mannequin.

Air Force and Navy medical personnel interact with a wounded training mannequin during the Tactical Field Care phase of the Tactical Combat Casualty Care course at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. TCCC training will better prepare medics for potential combat situations in an ongoing effort to heighten medical readiness and is crucial both at home and deployed environments. Medics participating in the newly designed TCCC course were instructed to wear non-serviceable uniforms and fully emerge themselves in a simulated real-life combat injury response. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Dermatologist technician records simulated wounds.

Senior Airman Kayla Vait, 374th Medical Group dermatologist technician records simulated wounds during the Tactical Field Care phase of the Tactical Combat Casualty Care course at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. Over the course of three days, personnel assigned to Yokota Air Base, Naval Air Facility Atsugi and Camp Zama Army Post, Japan, spent time in the classroom and in the field in order to complete TCCC training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Black Hawk Crew Chief gives the command for a gurney lift.

Private First Class Johnny Sellers, U.S. Aviation Battalion Japan 15T Black Hawk Crew Chief, gives the command for a gurney lift as part of a Tactical Combat Casualty Care assessment at Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. The program consists of three phases, Care Under Fire, Tactical Field Care and Tactical Evacuation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen participate in gurney carry as part of Tactical Combat Casualty Care.
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Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen participate in gurney carry as part of their Tactical Combat Casualty Care or TCCC assessment on Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. The implementation of TCCC enhances the readiness and battlefield capability and provides the tools and skills U.S. forces need to be equipped to continue to protect and defend the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Private First Class Johnny Sellers, U.S. Aviation Battalion Japan 15T Black Hawk Crew Chief, lifts simulated patient into UH-60 helicopter.
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Private First Class Johnny Sellers, U.S. Aviation Battalion Japan 15T Black Hawk Crew Chief, lifts simulated patient into UH-60 helicopter as part of a Tactical Combat Casualty Care or TCCC assessment on Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. TCCC is the new standard of medical training proficiency for military personnel to better prepare medics for potential combat situations in an ongoing effort to heighten medical readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Tactical Combat Casualty Care participants buckle seat belts of UH-60 helicopter.
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Tactical Combat Casualty Care participants buckle seat belts of UH-60 helicopter as part of a TCCC assessment on Sagami Depot, Sagamihara Japan, August 21, 2020. Over the course of three days, personnel assigned to Yokota Air Base, Naval Air Facility Atsugi and Camp Zama Army Post, Japan, spent time in the classroom and in the field in order to complete TCCC training. Medics participating in the newly designed TCCC course were instructed to wear non-serviceable uniforms and fully emerge themselves in a simulated real-life combat injury response. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

YOKOTA AIR FORCE BASE, Japan --

You have three minutes until your wingman bleeds out. You’re exhausted, sirens are blaring in your ear and you don’t have a hospital at your disposal, only what’s in your backpack and the skills you learned from Tactical Combat Casualty Care training.

Over the course of three days, medics assigned to Yokota Air Base, Naval Air Facility Atsugi and Camp Zama Army Post, Japan, practiced in the classroom and in the field to complete the newly designed TCCC training, Aug. 19 - 21.

“Having these skills is imperative to managing traumas in a combat or field setting,” U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Demetrius Johnson, 374th Medical Operations Squadron primary care flight chief and lead TCCC instructor. “Teaching our medics how to control hemorrhages, help someone breathe better and evacuate them out is the most important thing we can do.”

The program consists of three phases, Care Under Fire, Tactical Field Care and Tactical Evacuation, each with their own set of specific procedures.

“I really enjoyed going through Care Under Fire and Tactical Field Care,” said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Marc Perez, medical readiness training unit hospital corpsman. “It was a very eye-opening experience that showed me where I need to improve. We medical professionals are consistently evolving and learning things.”

This training will better prepare medics for potential combat situations in an ongoing effort to heighten medical readiness and is crucial both at home and in deployed environments said Johnson.

Anyone in a combat environment could potentially need a medic who graduated TCCC training. That injured person could be you, your son or daughter, your spouse, your grandkid, or a friend.

“I myself am married to an active duty member” said Dominic Trujillo-Hobbs, 374th Medical Group simulation operator & TCCC coordinator. “So, when I do these types of trainings, I think about my husband and how he could be deployed with one of these medics. I want to make sure they are knowledgeable and able to take care of him correctly so he can come back home to me. That’s why it’s important to me, but it could be anyone’s loved one.”

The implementation of TCCC enhances readiness, battlefield capability and provides the tools and skills U.S. forces need to protect and defend the Indo-Pacific region said Johnson.

“When the call comes, I want these medics to be prepared,” said Johnson “With everything that is going on in the world we need to be ready at all times.”