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Special handling technician marks a C-5M Supergalaxy for explosives

U.S Air Force Senior Airman Dawson Kilburn, 730th Air Mobility Squadron special handling technician, marks a C-5M Supergalaxy for explosives at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Sept. 21, 2020. The 730th AMS, which represents Air Mobility Command, is a key player in moving resources around the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Airmen prepare for a cargo download aboard C-5M Supergalaxy

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 730th Air Mobility Squadron prepare for a cargo download aboard C-5M Supergalaxy at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Sept. 21, 2020. The AMS works closely with the Japanese military to move a multitude of assets. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Airmen from the special handling shop direct a 60K operator for a cargo download

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 730th Air Mobility Squadron special handling shop direct a 60K operator for a cargo download at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Sept. 21, 2020. The special handling shop manages simple aerosols, paints, large vehicles, arms, ammunitions and explosives. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Tail of C5-Supergalaxy on flightline

U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 730th Air Mobility Squadron special handling shop direct a 60K operator for a download of cargo including Aegis missiles at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Sept. 21, 2020. The reception of live Aegis missiles is a rare and valuable opportunity for 730th Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

Special handling Airmen push Aegis missiles onto highline docks

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Dawson Kilburn, 730th Air Mobility Squadron special handling technician and U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Adian Tackett, 730th AMS special handling supervisor push Aegis missiles onto highline docks at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Sept. 21, 2020. Aegis missiles sustain the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force’s defense capabilities around Japanese waters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

C-5M Supergalaxy sits on the flight-line

A C-5M Supergalaxy sits on the flight-line during a cargo download at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Sept. 21, 2020. Working in the Pacific requires efficient communication with dozens of nations to ensure regional stability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica R. Avallone)

YOKOTA AIR FORCE BASE --

From aerosols and trucks to classified documents and medical supplies, 730th Air Mobility Squadron (AMS) work closely with the Japanese military to move a multitude of assets. In the month of August, special handling started receiving shipments of Aegis Missiles, which are meant to sustain the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) defense capabilities around Japan and its waters.

Aegis Destroyers patrol the areas surrounding Japan where enemies deploy ballistic missiles. In order to ensure readiness JMSDF developed the Ballistic Missile Defense system to shoot down any threat that gets too close. AMS and special handling ensures JMSDF are armed and ready.

“The 730th AMS’ mission is to provide rapid global mobility. To put it simply: Whatever the military needs, wherever in the world, we will get it there quick,” said Tech. Sgt. Titus Frazier, 730th AMS special planning shift supervisor “the thing that is unique about this is the type of Arms, Ammunitions and Explosives we are dealing with. It’s not just any regular type of missile. It’s the type of rocket that is vital to taking out other rockets that want to harm to us.”

Movements like these are often thankless but are key to deter threats against the livelihood of many.

“I feel like I have a part in keeping the nation of Japan safe. It's not every day that you can say you made such an impactful difference to people that don't even know we exist,” said Staff Sgt. Michael Freitas, 730th AMS special handling supervisor. “They don’t know this is happening right now but we’re ensuring their safety; that they get to live their lives without fear.”

Working in the pacific region requires efficient communication with a plethora of nations to ensure regional stability. That communication is built on trust.

“We don't just state that we're here for partners, we show them we’re here for them,” said Freitas. “We’re giving them the tools and the capabilities. We’re setting them up for success. Not only with words but with actions. What we’re putting in place now could potentially deter any threat that might come in the future.”