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Sun goes dark over Yokota

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- The moon covers the sun in an annular solar eclipse over Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 21, 2012. This event took place in Japan for the first time in 25 years, and Yokota was directly in the path to observe the moon centered over the sun. The eclipse is estimated to bolster the Japanese economy by 16.4 billion yen ($208 million) through eclipse-related merchandise and tourism, according to Kansai University economist Katsuhiro Miyamoto. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Samuel Morse)

The moon covers the sun in an annular solar eclipse over Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 21, 2012. This event took place in Japan for the first time in 25 years, and Yokota was directly in the path to observe the moon centered over the sun. The eclipse is estimated to bolster the Japanese economy by 16.4 billion yen ($208 million) through eclipse-related merchandise and tourism, according to Kansai University economist Katsuhiro Miyamoto. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Samuel Morse)

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- Capt. Drew Jernigan, 374th Airlift Wing legal office, and his wife Makiko enjoy watching the annular solar eclipse at Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 21, 2012. The annular solar eclipse, takes place when the moon covers as much as 94 percent of the sun resulting in a "ring of fire". (U.S. Air Force photo by Osakabe Yasuo)

Capt. Drew Jernigan, 374th Airlift Wing legal office, and his wife Makiko enjoy watching the annular solar eclipse at Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 21, 2012. The annular solar eclipse, takes place when the moon covers as much as 94 percent of the sun resulting in a "ring of fire". (U.S. Air Force photo/Osakabe Yasuo)

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- Master Sgt. Brian Mann, Defense Media Activity-Pacific, pacific theater maintenance superintendent, captures the annular solar eclipse with his custom-made pinhole filter at Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 21, 2012. The eclipse stretched from Southeast Asia across the Pacific Ocean to western parts of North America. (U.S. Air Force photo by Osakabe Yasuo)

Master Sgt. Brian Mann, Defense Media Activity-Pacific, pacific theater maintenance superintendent, captures the annular solar eclipse with his custom-made pinhole filter at Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 21, 2012. The eclipse stretched from Southeast Asia across the Pacific Ocean to western parts of North America. (U.S. Air Force photo/Osakabe Yasuo)

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- The moon covers the sun in an annular solar eclipse over Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 21, 2012. This event took place in Japan for the first time in 25 years, and Yokota was directly in the path to observe the moon centered over the sun. The eclipse is estimated to bolster the Japanese economy by 16.4 billion yen ($208 million) through eclipse-related merchandise and tourism, according to Kansai University economist Katsuhiro Miyamoto. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Samuel Morse)

The moon covers the sun in an annular solar eclipse over Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 21, 2012. This event took place in Japan for the first time in 25 years, and Yokota was directly in the path to observe the moon centered over the sun. The eclipse is estimated to bolster the Japanese economy by 16.4 billion yen ($208 million) through eclipse-related merchandise and tourism, according to Kansai University economist Katsuhiro Miyamoto. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Samuel Morse)

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- The annular solar eclipse occurs on the morning of May 21, 2012 for the first time in 173 years in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The annular eclipse was visible as it moved across eastern Asia, the northern Pacific Ocean and the western United States.  (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Osakabe Yasuo)

The annular solar eclipse occurs on the morning of May 21, 2012 for the first time in 173 years in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The annular eclipse was visible as it moved across eastern Asia, the northern Pacific Ocean and the western United States. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Osakabe Yasuo)