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  • US, JP firefighters unite for local fire prevention drill

    Members from the U.S. Air Force 374th Civil Engineer Squadron and the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force joined forces to participate in an annual fire prevention drill in Inagi City, Japan, Nov 5.During the event, the 374th CES engaged with the Inagi community, fielded questions about the P-22

  • Rapid runway repair to the rescue

    Exercise Beverly Morning 24-1 is Yokota Air Base’s annual, full-scale readiness exercise designed to enhance crisis response and fortify resilience across the base.

  • 374th Civil Engineer Squadron Changes Command

    Lt. Col. Michael Pluger assumed command of the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron from Lt. Col. Timothy Scheffler during a change of command ceremony at Yokota Air Base, Japan, July 26.

  • Yokota ‘Dirt Boys’ train Japan forces in Kanoya

    Members of the 374th Civil Engineering Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan, traveled to Kanoya Air Base, Japan, to demonstrate a spall repair for Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force civil engineers, May 15. 

  • Yokota hosts JASDF Chief of Staff for U.S.-Japan Leadership Program

    Gen. Shunji Izutsu, Japan Air Self-Defense Force Chief of Staff, and local Japan leaders visited U.S. Forces Japan to attend a U.S.-Japan Leadership Program gathering, reaffirming the importance of the U.S. Air Force – Japan Self-Defense Force alliance, March 19, 2022.

  • More power, lower cost, 374th CE updates base power grid

    The 374th Civil Engineer Squadron is striving to save Yokota Air Base approximately $20 million annually by upgrading Yokota Air Base’s power grid, a sprawling infrastructure project that aims to increase energy efficiency up to 30% and simultaneously improve operational readiness.

  • Newly installed AAS maintains Yokota’s readiness

    An F-16DJ Fighting Falcon assigned to the 35th Fighter Wing, Misawa Air Base, Japan, approaches a barrier cable during the initial certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The tail-hook latches onto